Website Copywriter Portfolio: Copywriting for Websites Big and Small

I’ve written everything from an email announcement to a 2,000-page ecommerce website…

I’ve supplied web content to many corporate and government clients including American Express, ninemsn, Toyota, David Jones, Vodafone, Telstra, McDonald’s and Philips. And a bunch of great little companies too. Here’s a selection of website copywriting samples:

Client: St.George
Project:
Website makeover

Stgeorge (1)

When St.George undertook a complete overhaul of their website, they asked me to write the content for the Business section.

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Client: Emagine / Optus
Project:
Mini-site

Optus

Emagine hired me to write the website copy for a new service offering for Optus prepaid customers.

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Client: Commodity Inspection Services
Project:
Web content

CIS

When Commodity Inspection Services relaunched their website they needed a copywriter who could explain their complex services in plain English.

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Client: Pipe Relining Services
Project:
Website launch

PipeRelining

When they launched their plumbing business, Pipe Relining Services hired me to write all the content for their new website.

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Client: Westpac
Project:
Mini-site
Wpac

When Westpac revamped their retirement planning mini-site they asked me to write the copy.

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Client: eBay
Project:
Update help section

ebay150

I worked with eBay’s Trust and Safety team to complete a top-to-bottom overhaul of their online help.

Client: SOAP / Hutchison Three
Project:
Flash promos

three150

Sydney interactive agency SOAP produced a series of online promos for Hutchison Three products. I helped out with the copywriting.

Client: Bank SA
Project:
Website makeover

BankSA

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Client: Singleton Ogilvy Interactive / Amercian Express
Project: Website re-launch

amex

Working with Singleton Ogilvy Interactive I re-wrote the merchant section of the American Express site to focus on the benefits of becoming a merchant.

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Client: juicemedia / NSW Government
Project: Interactive tool

energy

When The Department of Energy, Utilities and Sustainability revamped the functionality of these online tools I re-wrote the copy to improve useability and better meet the needs of the target market.

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Client: ReachLocal
Project:
Website launch

ReachLocal (1)

When ReachLocal needed a website to launch their business in Australia they hired text-centric to translate their complex service into easily understood benefits that would appeal to their SME target market.

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Client: Lanrex
Project:
Website relaunch

vf_website (1)

The new owners of this IT consultancy asked me to overhaul their marketing messages and rewrite their website content. I also created an online lead generation system for them.

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Client: VisionFoundry
Project: Website launch

vf_website (1)

VisionFoundry is a custom software developer in the U.S. They hired me to create compelling content about their highly technical services for their new website.

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Client: AVD Australia
Project:
Website launch

AVD_web

When AVD needed a new website they hired text-centric to develop the site map, create the content and write a white paper to attract customer enquiries.

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Client: Click2it
Project: Website makeover

patbright150

When Click2it needed fresh search engine optimization copywriting for their revamped website they turned to text-centric.

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Client: Brewster Murray
Project:
Website relaunch

bm-150

This esteemed architectural firm asked me to create the content for a new website to showcase their work.

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Client: Corporate KnowHow
Project: Website launch

corpknowhow150

I developed the key marketing messages with the client, workshopped the site structure with the designer and then wrote all the copy from scratch.

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Client: fmedge
Project:
Website launch

fm

Since fmedge was a start-up business I worked with management to create their key marketing messages and then wrote their website copy.

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Client: The Leading Edge
Project: Website re-launch

AVD_web

I worked with The Leading Edge’s marketing manager to refine their marketing messages and then wrote all the copy for the re-launch of their website.

Client: redshift

Project: Website makeover
& producer

patbright150

Together with boutique website developer infoArts I re-launched redshift’s website to better suit its marketing objectives.

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Client: Patrick Bright
Project:
Website launch

CIS

For this personal-branding site I polished the client’s content to clarify the marketing message and improve readability.

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Client: Mr Scoreboards
Project: Website launch

Stgeorge (1)

I did the copywriting and production for this ecommerce website. It has achieved many first page Google listings for competitive search terms.

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Like what you see?
Then why not put me to work on your next website copywriting project?Contact me now for a quote.

But wait… there’s more!
Need a freelance copywriter to smarten up your off-line marketing materials? Then you better check out my brochure copywriter portfolio and MarCom samples.

And if you want to see what my satisfied clients have to say about working with text-centric please read my testimonials.

What Good Marketers Know

Having completed a marketing degree I know how poorly university prepares students for the realities of marketing in the real world.

I’ve learnt so much more about marketing from reading books by the gurus than three years of tutorials and lectures ever taught me.

One person who knows a hell of a lot about marketing and isn’t afraid to share his wisdom is Seth Godin. Check out his one-page list of powerful marketing truths.

“Secret” Website Ingredient #3: Profitable Website Design

IngredientsMany websites seem to be designed for the sole purpose of being cool, different or winning design awards. But a business website must be designed to meet its business objectives. Otherwise it’s a waste of money… even if it does look good.

Good design is important on the Web. But if your site’s going to be a success, it can’t be designed in a vacuum. Here are four essential website design principles to help ensure your website is profitable:

1. Website usability

“Usability” is a fancy term that means “easy to use”. Website usability is important because people experience your website before they do business with you. If they have a good experience they’re more likely to turn into a loyal customer. If they get frustrated using your site, they’ll try somewhere else.

Simple, unobtrusive designs that support users are successful because they abide by the Web’s nature – and they make people feel good.
Jakob Nielsen, website usability guru

Here are four important guidelines for better usability:

Follow page layout conventions

Page layout conventions are like grammar for websites. They define the meaning of the page elements and give guidelines for putting them together. Your visitors will thank you for conforming to these conventions because it lets them focus on the task at hand, rather than learning how to use your site.

Write for scanners

People don’t read websites word for word. They scan the page looking for the information they want. Therefore your website content should be written for scanners.

Online text should have roughly 50% of the words you would use for print. Include lots of bullets, lists and meaningful sub-headings. Use links to break longer information up into parts.

Make text legible

Use a minimum 10 or 12 point font and allow users to adjust the size of the font in their browsers. Many over-40 folks struggle to read anything smaller than 14 point. Use dark text on a light background. Preferably black text on a white background.

Make links obvious

Make it obvious what’s clickable. Use coloured, underlined text for text links. Don’t underline non-link text. Change the colour of visited links so people know what they’ve already seen. Don’t open pages in new windows.

Usability is often the low hanging fruit when it comes to optimising a website. Research by Jakob Nielsen shows redesigning for usability improves key performance indicators by 83% on average.

2. Search engine-friendly

Search engines play a big role in your website’s success because they can bring prospective customers to your site.

Search engines catalogue the web using programs called spiders (or bots) which automatically index website content. You must ensure the design, architecture and coding of your site allow these spiders access to all your content.

Unfortunately, the average web design firm doesn’t understand the connection between site design, architecture and coding and search engine marketing techniques. This means you can end up with – unbeknownst to you – a website that’s invisible to the search engines.

Luckily Google has devoted a whole section of their website to this topic: Creating a Google-friendly site: Best practices. I recommend asking your web design firm to guarantee the site they build for you meets these guidelines.

3. Design follows content

Most websites are built backwards. Typically the developers create the design and then wait while the client scratches around trying to cobble the content together from old brochures and press releases.

This is not a recipe for success. Why? Because it’s the content that makes the sale. It’s what persuades people to pick up the phone, register for your newsletter or download your special report.

The function of the design is to complement the content. The design showcases your marketing message. The design should present the message so that it achieves the maximum impact. Design and content work hand in hand to help your achieve your website marketing goals.

Good website design is simple, clean, and used to draw the eyes to areas of interest where the visitor can interact with the site. But the content, not the design, is the most important element of your website. It should not be an afterthought. It should come before the design.

4. Design for credibility

People do judge books by their covers. And websites too. According to research by the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab, 75% of web users make judgements about the credibility of an organisation based on its website.

Most visitors make a snap judgement on the quality of your business, your products and your service based on a quick glance of your website. Customers expect a reputable company to have a professionally designed and attractive website. Clear navigation shows respect for visitors and suggests they can expect high levels of customer service.

Your industry and target market should determine the “dress code” for your website. If you’re a financial planner your website design should be the equivalent of a navy business suit. But if you sell skateboards then a t-shirt and cargo shorts design is OK. Pay attention to layout, typography, images and colours.

The acid test

For some strange reason many people’s expectations of design quality are downgraded when it comes to websites. But if it’s got your name on in it, it must look polished and professional. A good test of website design is whether it would look good printed out as a brochure or magazine ad.

This post is part 4 of the series: The 4 “Secret” Ingredients of a Profitable Website

Read part 5: Targeted Traffic

Put Your Important Content Above The Fold

FoldA good rule of thumb for web pages is to put the most important content “above the fold”. But what does this mean?

The term “above the fold” comes from the newspaper industry. Visualise a stack of broadsheet newspapers at a news stand. Because the paper is folded, all you can see is the top half of the first page. This section became known as “above the fold”.

Editors realised that in order to sell more papers they had to put the most interesting stories above the fold to attract people’s attention.

In website terms “above the fold” refers to the top part of the web page that readers can see without scrolling. Most users will not scroll unless they find something of interest above the fold.