A work in progress

A friend of mine had a job selling ad space for a local newspaper. He once sold a tiny ad to a delicatessen owner in a suburban shopping mall. The deli man put on extra staff the day the ad came out to cope with all the extra customers… who never showed.

It may have been because the ad was a dud. But it’s more likely that one tiny ad simply isn’t enough to build sales. The deli man didn’t know what all successful marketers know. As Jay Conrad Levinson so clearly explained in Guerrilla Marketing, “marketing is a process and not an event”.

Many business owners I talk have an “event” mindset when it comes to the web. They believe a website is a marketing silver bullet. They think all they have to do is get the site on the Web and the phone will start ringing and the orders pouring in. Unfortunately that rarely happens.

Getting the site built is just the beginning. You need to generate targeted traffic by search engine optimisation and/or marketing and offline promotion, you need to ensure you provide the right information to convert that traffic, you need to ensure you have sufficient functionality to satisfy customer needs, and you need to track performance and ROI.

Some prospects aren’t ready to buy right now or need warming up before they’ll convert. So you may need some stay-in-touch marketing, such as e-newsletters, email mini-courses, and downloadable reports or white papers. And you’ll need to update the content from time to time to keep the site looking fresh.

Your website is not an event. Think of it as a work in progress. Consider how your website can benefit your organisation over the long run. Make a wish list of the things you’d have on your ideal website. You may not have the resources or budget to do them all now, but you can build your site up over time.

Review your site’s content regularly. Ask for customer input and feedback on your site. What do people like/dislike? What would they like to see on your website? Fine tune your site to incorporate the best features of competitors’ sites and other sites you like.

If you do this your site will be more successful than the vast majority of business sites on the web. Slowly but surely you’ll transform your do-nothing site into a revenue generating asset.

Online punctuation #2 – URLs, full stops and semi colons

If you have a URL at the end of a sentence, don’t put a full stop after it. You’ll only confuse people. You probably shouldn’t be writing out URLs on a web page anyway. Rather than writing: “Visit the text-centric website at www.text-centric.com“, you should create a text link e.g. “Visit the text-centric website.”

I avoid using semi colons when writing online. They’re too easily mistaken for colons. According to Strunk & White, the proper use of a semi colon is to join two independent clauses into a compound sentence e.g. “It’s nearly midnight; the restaurants will probably be closed.”

On the web you’re better off using a full stop (period for my US readers) or an em-dash (long hyphen) e.g. “It’s nearly midnight. The restaurants will probably be closed.” or “It’s nearly midnight – the restaurants will probably be closed.”

The biggest workload


Came across this brilliant illustrated article about The Website Development Process.

Regarding content it says: “Working from the sitemap and wireframe, you and the client get together to start planning the content – specifically the text. Content planning and writing is probably the biggest workload the client will have during the project – and it canreally take some time.”

That’s exactly why you need a web copywriter on the team. Not only will they be able to produce the copy faster than the client, they can do it better.

The biggest workload

Came across this brilliant illustrated article about The Website Development Process.

Regarding content it says: “Working from the sitemap and wireframe, you and the client get together to start planning the content – specifically the text. Content planning and writing is probably the biggest workload the client will have during the project – and it can really take some time.”

That’s exactly why you need a web copywriter on the team. Not only will they be able to produce the copy faster than the client, they can do it better.

The “Biggest Workload” of Creating a Website

Came across this brilliant illustrated article about The Website Development Process.

Regarding content it says: “Working from the sitemap and wireframe, you and the client get together to start planning the content – specifically the text. Content planning and writing is probably the biggest workload the client will have during the project – and it can really take some time.”

That’s exactly why you need a web copywriter on the team. Not only will they be able to produce the copy faster than the client, they can do it better.

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  1. Content Templates: The Paint by Numbers Solution to Creating Quality Website Content